High School Burnout Signs And Tips

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Trying to graduate from high school, getting admitted to college, while spending as much time with friends and family as possible can break down any high school student. As a result, high school burnout is a real condition that affects too many kids today.

Don’t let your mind and body get subjected to high school burnout. Keep an eye out for the early warning signs and use our tips to stop it from happening.

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high school burnout

What is ‘Burnout’?

Burnout simultaneously affects high school students physically and mentally.

A simple definition of ‘burnout’ is a feeling of chronic stress that creates emotional and physical exhaustion.

Common feelings associated with high school burnout include:

  • Depression
  • Detachment
  • Cynicism
  • Lack of accomplishment and effectiveness

These behaviors can ultimately lead to self-destructive behavior, including suicidal tendencies. Teens unable to cope can turn to unhealthy habits including fighting, drugs, or other risky behaviors to temporarily relieve the stress.

Common High School Burnout Signs

Keep an eye out for the following behaviors or symptoms:

  • Depression – Student has lost interest in his or her friends, hobbies, etc. and has a decreased attention span.
  • Anxiety – Student displays outward feelings of anxiety for no apparent reason, as well as an inability to relax or sleep well.
  • Insomnia – Student suffers from a chronic inability to sleep at night, or wakes up and is unable to return to sleep.
  • Poor Eating Habits – Student is either chronically undereating or overeating, both behaviors are known as stress responses.
  • Nausea – Student is dealing with dizziness, stomach aches, and dry throat and mouth. stomach ache, dizziness, dryness of throat and mouth.

Burnout Relief Tips

Don’t Spread Yourself Too Thin

It’s easy to want to do everything but recognize your time and energy limits.

Some students face burnout because of overcommitment to too many activities. Trying to juggle school work with friends, family, sports, and other extracurriculars drains both free time and endurance.

Instead of trying to do everything, commit yourself to a couple of extracurriculars that you’re most passionate about. By doing so, you can put your full focus into them, while also staying on top of homework and personal commitments.

Carve Out Consistent Personal Time

Don’t forget to give yourself “me time”.

High school is hard for everyone when it comes to scheduling. Again, juggling the demands of classwork, family commitments, spending time with friends, and extracurriculars for college is exhausting.

Feeling like you’re living your life for everyone else but yourself is a common feeling among students. It’s important then to carve out a couple of hours a week for pure, self-reflective relaxation.

This could be as simple as setting aside an hour a day to play games, exercise, read, or any other calming hobby. The point is letting your mind settle and relax, so it can effectively recharge.

Get Comfortable Saying ‘No’

Don’t feel obligated to attend every event.

Everyone has obligations to meet, and part of growing up is knowing when to put those ahead of other things. Junior and senior year get hectic for students not only because of getting ready for college but finishing off high school too.

Studying for exams and college applications conflicts with extracurriculars. When friends and family invite you to too many events, the stress of having to say yes to everything is a burden.

Take the time to prioritize what you need to get done for your future, and realize that invitations will always come. No one expects you to come to everything all the time.

Don’t Be Afraid To Ask For Help

If you’re scared about falling behind on classwork or other school-related anxiety, reach out for guidance.

Speaking with a parent or counselor about your stresses and concerns is the first real step to avoid burnout. Feeling unafraid or too busy to seek out help often triggers the dominos into an emotional breakdown.

If your issues are academically related, then your guidance counselor is the first line of defense. Outside of that, your parents, older siblings, trusted friends, and other teachers should be available to listen and help.

People want you to succeed, but you have to let them know what’s going on.

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High School Burnout Signs And Tips FAQ

What is burnout?

A simple definition of burnout is a feeling of chronic stress that creates emotional and physical exhaustion. Common feelings associated with high school burnout include Depression, Detachment, Cynicism, and Lack of accomplishment and effectiveness.

What are some common burnout signs?

The most common burnout signs to look out for are Depression, Anxiety, Insomnia, Poor Eating Habits, and Nausea.

What’s a helpful tip to avoid burnout?

Get Comfortable Saying No. Don’t feel obligated to attend every event. Take the time to prioritize what you need to get done for your future, and realize that invitations will always come. No one expects you to come to everything all the time.

Who should I ask for help?

Your guidance counselor is the first line of defense. Outside of that, your parents, older siblings, trusted friends, and other teachers should be available to listen and help.